About your Search

20121112
20121120
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the cyberworld. technology drives everything we do the world wide web has made us more interconnected than at any time in our human history. the vast majority of our emperor structure resides in private sector. let me repeat that. the vast majority of our infrastructure in the united states reside in the private sector. the national security risks and economic risks are still with the private sector. the government does not do it alone. they do it in concert with all of our partners. our partners of the private sector. for those, but the work of the government or private sector, you can contribute no matter where you are in whatever your professional desired is. this private sector holds a lot of data. these assets are pretty profound. their protection to the united states priorities is of national importance. the president declared recently, and i quote, here is a list of priorities, this is in the top five. the cyber threat is one of the most serious economic and national security challenges we face as a nation and america's economic prosperity in the 21st century will depend on cyber security.
top technology companies, are asking us to preserve education and r&d, which is the bedrock of innovation and competitiveness. and this week, even the u.s. chamber of commerce said it was opened to a compromise that included revenue. these are the constructive voices i hope my colleagues listen to as we approach negotiations on the fiscal cliff. politics is the art of compromise, and working together we can reduce our nation's deficit and preserve strategic investments in those programs that fuel economic growth and competitiveness. even in the midst of the civil war, president lincoln and the 38th congress authorized the transcontinental railroad, the homestead act and the land grant college and university system. they understood we had to invest in the future while also dealing with the crisis of the present. no doubt we all have something to lose if we do not succeed. so perhaps by each of us giving a little we can revive this economic recovery, restore faith in our ability to govern responsible low and deliver on that mandate we just got last week from the voters. i yiel
has fallen off the table. we have the technology now to make this information available almost instantaneously. why not do it? host: we're talking with kathy kiely of the sunlight foundation. she has covered every presidential election since 1980. we will go to burt on the independent line. caller: i think that soft money is important, but in the grand scheme, not having equal time provisions in our broadcast is probably just as detrimental as not allowing certain opinions to appear. also, media conglomerates aggravate that even more so. guest: i think what the caller is referring to is cable television, which does not have the same rules and regulations. i am not an expert on the legal ramifications of equal time, but i think that is what he is talking about. as to media conglomerate, there are a lot of them, but certainly in this age, there are alternatives, too. host: in everything there is a point of diminishing returns. a road on advertising may do more harm than good. we go out to tempe, ariz. on the democratic line. good morning, lynette. caller: i have not been watching
be a light footprint with technological containment of the problem. when i hear $3.3 trillion, i hear the bulk of it is because of what happened on 9/11. my question is, in the new normal, what is the role for militant extremism? is it releasing them from jail and giving them a space and controlling them technologically? thank you. >> i will star with the last. if you think the light footprint strategy is all about containment, then it does raise the question of what are the limits of light footprint? what have we discovered it does not do terribly well? it does not build justice or build the kind of global development that paula was discussing before. it deliberately pulls the united states back from a kind of the engagement that we thought in the post-cold war world that we were heading into. and frankly, you might of thought we were heading into it just listening to president obama during the 2008 campaign when he talked mostly about engagement strategy. we did not hear a lot of discussion about what we have all been talking about here today. i think the fact that we have seen the
it comes to the technology that they were using to try to evade the surveillance state that they built. it's amazing. >> the other thing i find amazing is i remember going through the u.s. treasury in the height of the financial crisis, and back then, you had officials who were scribbling down important facts and figures on scrap paper because that was one of the few things they were able to legally throw away and get rid of. and if you go around other branches of the u.s. government today, people are intensely aware of the risks of e-mails being kept. if you go and talk to private sector banks, nobody working on a bank trading floor these days can possibly not be aware of the risks of tracking thoughts and e-mails. and yet somehow the military just seems not to have noticed this. it is very, very striking. >> there's one other dedataidei this "journal" story, kelley had second thoughts. and people said they made the request, quote, she was worried about the personal information being provided to investigators. >> like the diplomatic license plates. >> talk about the horse after it's left
, technology and clean energy, putting people back to work, rebuilding our roads, bridges and our schools and reducing our deficit in a balanced and responsible way. now, on this last item, we face a very clear deadline that requires us to make some big decisions on jobs, taxes and deficits by the end of the year. both parties voted to set this deadline and i believe that both parties can work together to make these decisions in a balanced and responsible way. yesterday i had a chance to meet with labor and civic leaders for their input. today i'm meeting with ceos of some of america's largest companies and i'll meet with leaders of both parties of congress before the week is out. because there's only one way to solve these challenges. that is to do it together. as i've said before, i'm open to compromise and i'm open to new ideas. and i've been encouraged over the past week to hear republican after republican agree on the need for more revenue from the wealthiest americans as part of our arithmetic if we're going to be serious about reducing the deficit. because when it comes to taxes, t
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)